Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Sign In  |  Sign up
Your Cart (0)
Best Deals
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > Language and Literature > Sanskrit in 30 Lectures
Subscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Sanskrit in 30 Lectures
Sanskrit in 30 Lectures
Description
Introduction

1. Importance of Sanskrit “If it was asked what is the greatest treasure which India possesses and what is her finest heritage, I would answer unhestingly it is the Sanskrit language and literature and all that it contains. This is a magnificant inheritance, and so long as this endures and influences the life of our people, so long will the basic genius of india continue.” These are the words, not of a devout orthodox, Hindu, but of Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru who was rather heterodox and disliked most of the orthodox practices. Sanskrit , indeed, marks the climax of india’s glory. The translation of Shakuntala into English by William Jones in 1789 was one of the greatest events of modern times. It sent a wave of enthusiasm for Sanskrit throughout Europe. Shakuntala was translated into Latin and a number of other European languages. Hundreds of European scholars with Greek, Iralic, Celtic, German, Blato-Slavonic and Iranian languages, constituting the Indo-European scholars turned to the study of Sanskrit family of languages, was discovered. This led to the foundation of a new science, Comparative Philology. “Since the Renaissance there has been no event of such world-wide significance in the history of culture as the discovery of Sanskrit literature in the later part of the 18th century.” William jones wrote in 1786-“The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more prefect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin and more exquisitely refined than either.”

The intellectual enthusiasm of European people in those days was directed towards all spheres of discovery and invention, but there was an additional reason for this keen and special interest in sanskrit.

After the establishment of the Indo-European family of languages, they found that Sanskrit was a language of the same family, as their own language of the same family, as their own language, and they realized that the Indians speaking Sanskrtic languages were their own kith and kin. It has made even a deeper appeal to the new socialist world which has come into existence on this basis of Marxism. Recently, Kalidasa’s jubilee was celebrated in all parts of the U.S.S.R. the Soviet people hailed Kalidasa as a poet of humanity, and not of India alone.

2. Irresisitble Charm of Sanskrit

Apart from the glory of Sanskrit as a language occupying a place of honour in the languages of the world, it has a charm of its own which makes direct personal appeal to every one, especially to an Indian. The present writer, otherwise heterodox, has always been thrilled by the irresistible beauty of Sanskrit language and its literature. Its remarkable elasticity, its unsusal expressive power and unbounded suggestiveness, its way of putting an idea in a charming form, its humour and subtle wit and, above all its exalted moral tone, have always appealed to every one who has a sense of beauty. The question aries regarding the reason and sources of that irresistible charm of Sanskrit.

Two things in this context are significant, it is the nature of a spoken dialect that it undergoes constant. The literary form of a language, on the other hand, is by nature stationary. But changes do occur even in the literary form of a language; only they are very slow. The same principle applies to old Sanskrit also. The language of Rgveda, later Samhitas, undergo changes. But about the 4th century B.C., there appeared on the Indian horizon, an intellectual giant, Panini, the greatest perfect that it exercised an over-bearing authority; and no change thenceforward was permitted. Sanskrit become a changeless language.

There is yet another feature of Sanskrit which differentiates it form all other literary works in all the periods of Indian history, and continues to be so used even today. In the case of other classical languages like Hebrew, Greek or Latin, some ceremonial compositions might have been attempted even in later periods, but they have ceased since long to be used for new literary compositions, at leasts in their old forms; and hence those classical language in the sence that it is the same Sanskrit in which valmiki wrote more 3000 years ago and in which a Sanskrit scholar writes today. An unchanging and living Sanskrit has rightly been called ‘Devavani,; the speech of gods, who do not age, do not die and enjoy eternal youth.

Contents

Forewordv
Acknowledgementvi
Contentsviii
A Premilinary notexix
Sanskrit Alphabetxxii
Abbreviations of Termsxxiii
Symbolsxxiii
Abbreviations of worksxxiv
Introduction1
Lecture1 (Sanskrit in the classification of languages12
Lecture 2 (Sanskrit Alphabet)20
Lecture 3 (Sandhi euphonic changes)31
Lecture 4 (Structure of Sanskrit)39
Lecture 5 (voice)44
Lecture 6 (Conjudations)50
Lecture757
Lecture 864
Lecture 967
Lecture 1071
Lecture 1175
Lecture 1280
Lecture 1385
Lecture 1489
Lecture 1592
Lecture 1696
Lecture 17100
Lecture 18103
Lecture 19108
Lecture 20111
Lecture 21115
Lecture 22119
Lecture 23123
Lecture 24128
Lecture 25133
Lecture 26139
Lecture 27144
Lecture 28150
Lecture 29155
Lecture 30161
Translation Notes197
Appendix I238
Appendix I250
Appendix II263
VOCABULARY280
Beautiful saying from the text317
Alphabetical index of the text324

Sanskrit in 30 Lectures

Item Code:
NAG045
Cover:
Paperback
Edition:
2003
Language:
English
Size:
8.5 inch X 5.5 inch
Pages:
360
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 504 gms
Price:
$10.00   Shipping Free
Notify me when this item is available
Notify me when this item is available
You will be notified when this item is available
Be the first to rate this product
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
Sanskrit in 30 Lectures
From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 3623 times since 3rd Apr, 2014
Introduction

1. Importance of Sanskrit “If it was asked what is the greatest treasure which India possesses and what is her finest heritage, I would answer unhestingly it is the Sanskrit language and literature and all that it contains. This is a magnificant inheritance, and so long as this endures and influences the life of our people, so long will the basic genius of india continue.” These are the words, not of a devout orthodox, Hindu, but of Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru who was rather heterodox and disliked most of the orthodox practices. Sanskrit , indeed, marks the climax of india’s glory. The translation of Shakuntala into English by William Jones in 1789 was one of the greatest events of modern times. It sent a wave of enthusiasm for Sanskrit throughout Europe. Shakuntala was translated into Latin and a number of other European languages. Hundreds of European scholars with Greek, Iralic, Celtic, German, Blato-Slavonic and Iranian languages, constituting the Indo-European scholars turned to the study of Sanskrit family of languages, was discovered. This led to the foundation of a new science, Comparative Philology. “Since the Renaissance there has been no event of such world-wide significance in the history of culture as the discovery of Sanskrit literature in the later part of the 18th century.” William jones wrote in 1786-“The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more prefect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin and more exquisitely refined than either.”

The intellectual enthusiasm of European people in those days was directed towards all spheres of discovery and invention, but there was an additional reason for this keen and special interest in sanskrit.

After the establishment of the Indo-European family of languages, they found that Sanskrit was a language of the same family, as their own language of the same family, as their own language, and they realized that the Indians speaking Sanskrtic languages were their own kith and kin. It has made even a deeper appeal to the new socialist world which has come into existence on this basis of Marxism. Recently, Kalidasa’s jubilee was celebrated in all parts of the U.S.S.R. the Soviet people hailed Kalidasa as a poet of humanity, and not of India alone.

2. Irresisitble Charm of Sanskrit

Apart from the glory of Sanskrit as a language occupying a place of honour in the languages of the world, it has a charm of its own which makes direct personal appeal to every one, especially to an Indian. The present writer, otherwise heterodox, has always been thrilled by the irresistible beauty of Sanskrit language and its literature. Its remarkable elasticity, its unsusal expressive power and unbounded suggestiveness, its way of putting an idea in a charming form, its humour and subtle wit and, above all its exalted moral tone, have always appealed to every one who has a sense of beauty. The question aries regarding the reason and sources of that irresistible charm of Sanskrit.

Two things in this context are significant, it is the nature of a spoken dialect that it undergoes constant. The literary form of a language, on the other hand, is by nature stationary. But changes do occur even in the literary form of a language; only they are very slow. The same principle applies to old Sanskrit also. The language of Rgveda, later Samhitas, undergo changes. But about the 4th century B.C., there appeared on the Indian horizon, an intellectual giant, Panini, the greatest perfect that it exercised an over-bearing authority; and no change thenceforward was permitted. Sanskrit become a changeless language.

There is yet another feature of Sanskrit which differentiates it form all other literary works in all the periods of Indian history, and continues to be so used even today. In the case of other classical languages like Hebrew, Greek or Latin, some ceremonial compositions might have been attempted even in later periods, but they have ceased since long to be used for new literary compositions, at leasts in their old forms; and hence those classical language in the sence that it is the same Sanskrit in which valmiki wrote more 3000 years ago and in which a Sanskrit scholar writes today. An unchanging and living Sanskrit has rightly been called ‘Devavani,; the speech of gods, who do not age, do not die and enjoy eternal youth.

Contents

Forewordv
Acknowledgementvi
Contentsviii
A Premilinary notexix
Sanskrit Alphabetxxii
Abbreviations of Termsxxiii
Symbolsxxiii
Abbreviations of worksxxiv
Introduction1
Lecture1 (Sanskrit in the classification of languages12
Lecture 2 (Sanskrit Alphabet)20
Lecture 3 (Sandhi euphonic changes)31
Lecture 4 (Structure of Sanskrit)39
Lecture 5 (voice)44
Lecture 6 (Conjudations)50
Lecture757
Lecture 864
Lecture 967
Lecture 1071
Lecture 1175
Lecture 1280
Lecture 1385
Lecture 1489
Lecture 1592
Lecture 1696
Lecture 17100
Lecture 18103
Lecture 19108
Lecture 20111
Lecture 21115
Lecture 22119
Lecture 23123
Lecture 24128
Lecture 25133
Lecture 26139
Lecture 27144
Lecture 28150
Lecture 29155
Lecture 30161
Translation Notes197
Appendix I238
Appendix I250
Appendix II263
VOCABULARY280
Beautiful saying from the text317
Alphabetical index of the text324
Post a Comment
 
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy
Based on your browsing history
Loading... Please wait

Items Related to Sanskrit in 30 Lectures (Language and Literature | Books)

Treasure of Sanskrit Expressions (Sanskrit Quotations)
Item Code: NAC421
$34.50
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Testimonials
Namaste and many thanks! Lovely collection you have! Tempted to buy so many books!
Revathi, USA
I received my order. Thanks for giving the platform to purchase artifacts of our culture. You guys are doing a great job. Appreciate it and wish you guys the best.
Manju, USA
Fantastic! Thank You for amazing service and fast replies!
Sonia, Sweden
I’ve started receiving many of the books I’ve ordered and every single one of them (thus far) has been fantastic - both the books themselves, and the execution of the shipping. Safe to say I’ll be ordering many more books from your website :)
Hithesh, USA
I have received the book Evolution II.  Thank you so much for all of your assistance in making this book available to me.  You have been so helpful and kind.
Colleen, USA
Thanks Exotic India, I just received a set of two volume books: Brahmasutra Catuhsutri Sankara Bhasyam
I Gede Tunas
You guys are beyond amazing. The books you provide not many places have and I for one am so thankful to have found you.
Lulian, UK
This is my first purchase from Exotic India and its really good to have such store with online buying option. Thanks, looking ahead to purchase many more such exotic product from you.
Probir, UAE
I received the kaftan today via FedEx. Your care in sending the order, packaging and methods, are exquisite. You have dressed my body in comfort and fashion for my constrained quarantine in the several kaftans ordered in the last 6 months. And I gifted my sister with one of the orders. So pleased to have made a connection with you.
EB Cuya FIGG, USA
Thank you for your wonderful service and amazing book selection. We are long time customers and have never been disappointed by your great store. Thank you and we will continue to shop at your store
Michael, USA
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2021 © Exotic India