Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Sign In  |  Sign up
Your Cart (0)
Best Deals
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > Hindu > Gods > Rediscovering God with Transcendental Argument - A Contemporary Interpretation of Monistic Kashmiri Saiva Philosophy
Subscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Rediscovering God with Transcendental Argument - A Contemporary Interpretation of Monistic Kashmiri Saiva Philosophy
Rediscovering God with Transcendental Argument - A Contemporary Interpretation of Monistic Kashmiri Saiva Philosophy
Description
Back of book

“Other scholars have written on Utpaladeva, Abhinavagupta, and other philosophical giants in the tradition of monistic Saiva thought. But there is very little on this system of thought written by a scholar so well-read in western philosophy and so versed in the issues pertaining to comparative philosophy as is Lawrence. His wide horizon invites readers to a fuller and more expansive understanding of Pratyabhijna in particular and of the philosophical structure and dynamics of transcendental logic in general, both in India and in the West.

“I like many things about this excellent work, which presents and interprets a profoundly thoughtful and systematic philosophical religious stance from medieval India from a genuinely comparative perspective.”

William K. Mahony, author of The Artful Universe: An introduction to the Vedic religious imagination rediscovering God with transcendental argument provides a comparative philosophical study of the Pratyabhijna system of the medieval Kashmiri Saiva thinkers Utpaladeva and Abhinavagupta. Beginning with intensive descriptive and prescriptive reflections on the nature of philosophy itself, the book examines the special characteristics of the Pratyabhijna discourse as both philosophical apologetics and spiritual exercise. Lawrence situates the Pratyabhijna speculation within the larger context of Hindu and Buddhist deliberations about the role of interpretation in experience, and gives a groundbreaking exposition of the epistemology and ontology of Siva’s self-recognition. He observes the similarities and differences of the Pratyabhijna with Christian understandings of the divine logos, and argues that the Saiva philosophy elucidates a cogent way of demonstrating the reality of God against contemporary relativism, deconstructionism and other forms of skepticism.

David Peter Lawrence is Assistant Professor in the division of Humanities at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology.

A volume in the Suny series, Toward a Comparative philosophy of religions Paul J. Griffiths and Laurie L. Patton, editors.

 

Foreword

David Lawrence’s work, like all the volumes in this series, is both constructively philosophical (it has an argument of its own to make) and deeply engaged with the texts of a non- Western philosophical tradition- in this case those of the monistic Saivites of Kashmir. It is difficult to separate the constructive and exegetical parts of Lawrence’s work. This is as it should be, for Lawrence wants both to restate and to argue in support of the central metaphysical claim of his Indian interlocutors, which is that it is impossible coherently to deny God’s existence. This goal makes Lawrence’s work perhaps the most strictly metaphysical of those so far published in this series.

Lawrence provides, we think, the most detailed, accurate, and philosophically acute restatement of the central metaphysical claims of Utpaladeva and Abhinavagupta (the two principal theorists of the monistic Kashmiri Saiva School) yet available in any Western language. This is a great virtue because this school’s theorists are the architects of a subtle, complex, and challenging metaphysical system. It is a system of great internal complexity, the full understanding of which requires mastery (or at least a very substantial knowledge) of almost every significant school of Indian philosophical thought. Abhinavagupta, especially, is remarkable for the range of his learning: in addition to the specifically philosophico-theological works that are the focus of this study, he composed works on linguistics, grammar, ritual, dance, literary theory- and more. Understanding his work sufficiently well to interpret it adequately therefore requires substantial learning of a strictly Sanskritic kind, and Lawrence uses his own erudition and Sanskrit learning effectively to elucidate the complex intellectual context of Abhinavagupta’s thought.

Utpaladeva’s and Abhinavagupta’s thought is hardly known as yet to those outside the charmed circle of Sanskritists and Indologists. Its philosophical bite is even less well understood, but it is deep and of considerable interest to all philosophers concerned with the nature of transcendental argument. Since most of the interpretive work on Utpaladeva and Abhinavagupta to date has dealt with historical and textual questions, or with the ritual context and implications of their thought, Lawrence’s book is a vital step in making the more strictly philosophical aspects of this thought available to a readership without technical qualifications in Sanskrit or Indian studies.

Rediscovering God also comes at an opportune time so far as contemporary English-language philosophy is concerned. The last three decades have seen a renewed interest in transcendental argument, both in the philosophy of religion, which is, historically speaking, its place of origin and proper home, but also in metaphysics proper. In addition to the work of Alvin Plantinga (especially in the Nature of Necessity, 1974) and Charles Hartshorne (Anselm’s Discovery, 1965), who were pioneers in this renaissance, there is an increasing flood of recent work, of which a representative sample is Graham Oppy’s Ontological Arguments (1995). Lawrence’s detailed and serious treatment of the topic from a basis of engagement with Indian materials should therefore find many points of contact in contemporary Anglophone philosophy, and is likely to enrich that discussion significantly.

Rediscovering God is more than an exegetical work, however. Lawrence thinks that Abhinavagupta and Utpaladeva were right in at least one central point, which is that all arguments that fail to recognize God as a condition of the possibility of their framing must necessarily be incoherent. This means, he thinks, that Abhinavagupta and Utpaladeva provide essential tools for the decisive refutation of skepticism. It doesn’t mean that these tools are found only in these particular Indian forms of thought; it is an additional strength of this book that Lawrence can and does indicate the points of congruence and difference between monistic Saiva thought on these topics and some of the major trends in Western philosophical thinking, and that in the process of doing so he often sheds light on the thought of individuals who have probably never before been considered together. Both Abhinavagupta and Bernard Lonergan, for example, are illuminated in this book, and in ways that both would almost certainly approve of.

Lawrence’s metaphysical emphasis scarcely needs an apology; it is part of the comparative philosophy of religions as we understand it to treat all elements of the philosophical enterprise, and metaphysics is among the more interesting of these. That it is also a mode of philosophizing that requires the theses for which it argues to be necessarily true if they are true at all, and that among these theses is the existence of God, surely only adds to its interest.

 

Contents

 

  Foreword ix
  Acknowledgments xiii
  Abbreviations xvii
1. Introduction 1
2. Interpretive Histories and the scope of this study 27
3. The task of the Pratyabhijna system 35
4. The challenge of the Buddhist Opponents 67
5. A summary of the Saiva theory of recognition 85
6. Epistemological applications of the theory of recognition 107
7. Features of the ontology of recognition 133
8. Conclusion 155
  Notes 171
  Bibliography 249
  Index 293

Sample Pages



























Rediscovering God with Transcendental Argument - A Contemporary Interpretation of Monistic Kashmiri Saiva Philosophy

Item Code:
IHJ064
Cover:
Hardcover
Edition:
2000
ISBN:
8170306590
Language:
English
Size:
9.0 inch X 6.7 inch
Pages:
306
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 518 gms
Price:
$30.00   Shipping Free
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
Rediscovering God with Transcendental Argument - A Contemporary Interpretation of Monistic Kashmiri Saiva Philosophy

Verify the characters on the left

From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 9731 times since 28th Oct, 2015
Back of book

“Other scholars have written on Utpaladeva, Abhinavagupta, and other philosophical giants in the tradition of monistic Saiva thought. But there is very little on this system of thought written by a scholar so well-read in western philosophy and so versed in the issues pertaining to comparative philosophy as is Lawrence. His wide horizon invites readers to a fuller and more expansive understanding of Pratyabhijna in particular and of the philosophical structure and dynamics of transcendental logic in general, both in India and in the West.

“I like many things about this excellent work, which presents and interprets a profoundly thoughtful and systematic philosophical religious stance from medieval India from a genuinely comparative perspective.”

William K. Mahony, author of The Artful Universe: An introduction to the Vedic religious imagination rediscovering God with transcendental argument provides a comparative philosophical study of the Pratyabhijna system of the medieval Kashmiri Saiva thinkers Utpaladeva and Abhinavagupta. Beginning with intensive descriptive and prescriptive reflections on the nature of philosophy itself, the book examines the special characteristics of the Pratyabhijna discourse as both philosophical apologetics and spiritual exercise. Lawrence situates the Pratyabhijna speculation within the larger context of Hindu and Buddhist deliberations about the role of interpretation in experience, and gives a groundbreaking exposition of the epistemology and ontology of Siva’s self-recognition. He observes the similarities and differences of the Pratyabhijna with Christian understandings of the divine logos, and argues that the Saiva philosophy elucidates a cogent way of demonstrating the reality of God against contemporary relativism, deconstructionism and other forms of skepticism.

David Peter Lawrence is Assistant Professor in the division of Humanities at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology.

A volume in the Suny series, Toward a Comparative philosophy of religions Paul J. Griffiths and Laurie L. Patton, editors.

 

Foreword

David Lawrence’s work, like all the volumes in this series, is both constructively philosophical (it has an argument of its own to make) and deeply engaged with the texts of a non- Western philosophical tradition- in this case those of the monistic Saivites of Kashmir. It is difficult to separate the constructive and exegetical parts of Lawrence’s work. This is as it should be, for Lawrence wants both to restate and to argue in support of the central metaphysical claim of his Indian interlocutors, which is that it is impossible coherently to deny God’s existence. This goal makes Lawrence’s work perhaps the most strictly metaphysical of those so far published in this series.

Lawrence provides, we think, the most detailed, accurate, and philosophically acute restatement of the central metaphysical claims of Utpaladeva and Abhinavagupta (the two principal theorists of the monistic Kashmiri Saiva School) yet available in any Western language. This is a great virtue because this school’s theorists are the architects of a subtle, complex, and challenging metaphysical system. It is a system of great internal complexity, the full understanding of which requires mastery (or at least a very substantial knowledge) of almost every significant school of Indian philosophical thought. Abhinavagupta, especially, is remarkable for the range of his learning: in addition to the specifically philosophico-theological works that are the focus of this study, he composed works on linguistics, grammar, ritual, dance, literary theory- and more. Understanding his work sufficiently well to interpret it adequately therefore requires substantial learning of a strictly Sanskritic kind, and Lawrence uses his own erudition and Sanskrit learning effectively to elucidate the complex intellectual context of Abhinavagupta’s thought.

Utpaladeva’s and Abhinavagupta’s thought is hardly known as yet to those outside the charmed circle of Sanskritists and Indologists. Its philosophical bite is even less well understood, but it is deep and of considerable interest to all philosophers concerned with the nature of transcendental argument. Since most of the interpretive work on Utpaladeva and Abhinavagupta to date has dealt with historical and textual questions, or with the ritual context and implications of their thought, Lawrence’s book is a vital step in making the more strictly philosophical aspects of this thought available to a readership without technical qualifications in Sanskrit or Indian studies.

Rediscovering God also comes at an opportune time so far as contemporary English-language philosophy is concerned. The last three decades have seen a renewed interest in transcendental argument, both in the philosophy of religion, which is, historically speaking, its place of origin and proper home, but also in metaphysics proper. In addition to the work of Alvin Plantinga (especially in the Nature of Necessity, 1974) and Charles Hartshorne (Anselm’s Discovery, 1965), who were pioneers in this renaissance, there is an increasing flood of recent work, of which a representative sample is Graham Oppy’s Ontological Arguments (1995). Lawrence’s detailed and serious treatment of the topic from a basis of engagement with Indian materials should therefore find many points of contact in contemporary Anglophone philosophy, and is likely to enrich that discussion significantly.

Rediscovering God is more than an exegetical work, however. Lawrence thinks that Abhinavagupta and Utpaladeva were right in at least one central point, which is that all arguments that fail to recognize God as a condition of the possibility of their framing must necessarily be incoherent. This means, he thinks, that Abhinavagupta and Utpaladeva provide essential tools for the decisive refutation of skepticism. It doesn’t mean that these tools are found only in these particular Indian forms of thought; it is an additional strength of this book that Lawrence can and does indicate the points of congruence and difference between monistic Saiva thought on these topics and some of the major trends in Western philosophical thinking, and that in the process of doing so he often sheds light on the thought of individuals who have probably never before been considered together. Both Abhinavagupta and Bernard Lonergan, for example, are illuminated in this book, and in ways that both would almost certainly approve of.

Lawrence’s metaphysical emphasis scarcely needs an apology; it is part of the comparative philosophy of religions as we understand it to treat all elements of the philosophical enterprise, and metaphysics is among the more interesting of these. That it is also a mode of philosophizing that requires the theses for which it argues to be necessarily true if they are true at all, and that among these theses is the existence of God, surely only adds to its interest.

 

Contents

 

  Foreword ix
  Acknowledgments xiii
  Abbreviations xvii
1. Introduction 1
2. Interpretive Histories and the scope of this study 27
3. The task of the Pratyabhijna system 35
4. The challenge of the Buddhist Opponents 67
5. A summary of the Saiva theory of recognition 85
6. Epistemological applications of the theory of recognition 107
7. Features of the ontology of recognition 133
8. Conclusion 155
  Notes 171
  Bibliography 249
  Index 293

Sample Pages



























Post a Comment
 
Post Review
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy
Based on your browsing history
Loading... Please wait

Items Related to Rediscovering God with Transcendental Argument - A Contemporary... (Hindu | Books)

Yoga in Kashmir Saivism
Item Code: NAL215
$25.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Kashmir Saivism – The Central Philosophy of Tantrism
by Kamalakar Mishra
Hardcover (Edition: 2011)
Indica Books
Item Code: NAC688
$35.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Specific Principles of Kashmir Saivism
Item Code: IHD61
$30.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Self Realization in Kashmir Shaivism: The Oral Teachings of Swami Lakshman Joo
by John Hughes
Hardcover (Edition: 1997)
Sri Satguru Publications
Item Code: IHL238
$25.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Touch of Sakti (A Study in Non-dualistic Trika Saivism of Kashmir)
by Ernst Furlinger
Hardcover (Edition: 2017)
D. K. Printworld Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: IHE028
$35.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Kashmir Saivaism (Shaivism)
by J. C. Chatterji
Hardcover (Edition: 2004)
Parimal Publication Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: IDF405
$20.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Systems of Vedanta And Kashmir Saivism (C.A.D. 300?1000)
Item Code: NAC825
$25.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Trika Saivism Of Kashmir
Item Code: IDD850
$39.50
SOLD
Kashmir Shaivism: The Secret Supreme
Item Code: IDH559
$22.50
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Testimonials
Excellent products and efficient delivery.
R. Maharaj, Trinidad and Tobago
Aloha Vipin, The books arrived today in Hawaii -- so fast! Thank you very much for your efficient service. I'll tell my friends about your company.
Linda, Hawaii
Thank you for all of your continued great service. We love doing business with your company especially because of its amazing selections of books to study. Thank you again.
M. Perry, USA
Kali arrived safely—And She’s amazing! Thank you so much.
D. Grenn, USA
A wonderful Thangka arrived. I am looking forward to trade with your store again.
Hideo Waseda, Japan
Thanks. Finally I could find that wonderful book. I love India , it's Yoga, it's culture. Thanks
Ana, USA
Good to be back! Timeless classics available only here, indeed.
Allison, USA
I am so glad I came across your website! Oceans of Grace.
Aimee, USA
I got the book today, and I appreciate the excellent service. I am 82, and I am trying to learn Sanskrit till I can speak and write well in this superb language.
Dr. Sundararajan
Wonderful service and excellent items. Always sent safely and arrive in good order. Very happy with firm.
Dr. Janice, Australia
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2019 © Exotic India